Tag Archives: Luna Laws

Guest Post: The Potential and Limitations of Technology in Idaho Education

Guest Post by Jeriann Ireland.

The use of technology in the classroom has both the capability of increasing efficiency and accelerating student learning and the potential to become a distraction. As such, technology in education is a pressing issue that teachers, parents, and students feel strongly about. Industry argues that knowledge of how to use technology is important for job-preparedness. Studies demonstrate that too much technology will stunt students’ emotional growth and prevent them from learning how to think. This dichotomy does not necessarily have to be at odds with each itself, but often is when it comes to discussions of funding and curriculum. Continue reading

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Part 1

By Victoria M. Young

Let’s dive right into the middle of the recommendations from the Governor’s Task Force for Improving Education and pull “the bad” to the surface. Let’s get it over with — again.

This should sound familiar; Bad for children. Bad for teachers. Bad for Idaho. Yes, the Luna Laws—Students Come First. They’re back!

The one based on the false premise that changing contract negotiations improves education has already come to the surface through the collaborative efforts of the Idaho School Boards Association (ISBA) and budget writers last year. Voters said no to Prop 1. We wanted to “preserve a teacher’s freedom to speak up on behalf of Idaho’s students.” ISBA, administration, and lawmakers made other plans. And we swallowed that small bite last year without much fuss as teachers’ bargaining was limited. Continue reading

OBJECTION!

By Victoria M. Young

DSC_0300_ppI say potāto; you say potåto. Some say, “blueprint”; others say, “roadmap.” The way Betsy Russell rightly put it, from her perspective at the statehouse, “everybody overall agrees” — at the statehouse —with the 20 recommendations made by Idaho’s Task Force for Improving Education.

Objection; foul; time out!

We learned from the “resounding rejected” of the Students Come First LAWS that process matters. Right? Those laws passed despite demonstrative objections in hearings, on-line, and in the streets. THEN, they were defeated by voters as referendums. That process squandered people’s time and it put Idaho two years behind others in a true improvement process. Continue reading